Orthodox Catholic Lines of Canonical Apostolic Succession

‘Saint Eligius Consecrated as a Bishop’ (ca. 1527 AD) by Pere Nunyes
Beyond the valid customary practices of the Ancient Priesthood, and the legitimacy of the Templar Lines, the canonical Apostolic practice of Catholic Christianity also involves the “laying on of hands” (Acts 1:22, 1:25-26, 6:1-6, 9:17; 13:1-5; I Timothy 4:1, 4:14, 5:22; II Timothy 1:6). This includes “anointing” by sacred oils, such as the Pontifical consecration of the Biblical King Solomon (I Kings 1:39) [5], which was also practiced in the Ancient Priesthood in Egypt (the hieroglyphics ‘Se Neter’ meaning “to consecrate” literally mean to “infuse with the Holiness of God”) [6].

Continuing this Apostolic tradition, in addition to the historical Templar Lines (preserved by the Order of the Temple of Solomon by its own means), the Ancient Catholic Church was further restored by an infusion of fully documented canonical Apostolic lines. All of these lines passed from Jesus ca. 33 AD through a long succession of Saints, Catholic Bishops and Popes of the Vatican Holy See of the Roman Catholic Church, and are thus informally called “Vatican Lines”.

These Orthodox Catholic Lines, by consecrations from Independent Bishops of the Old Catholic, Reformed Catholic and Liberal Catholic movements, were vested in the Grand Mastery of the modern Templar Order, which in turn vested them in the Pontifical Curia of the autonomous Ancient Catholic Church, throughout the year 2015.

As a result of this canonical full restoration of the Episcopal Pontificate, the Ancient Catholic Church additionally carries an accumulated 66 Vatican Lines of canonical Apostolic Succession, which represent multiple traditions from the history of Christianity.

This enables its Clergy to interact with diverse Christian denominations, having the relevant ecclesiastical lineages to support ecumenical spiritual practices, and to administer sacraments in accordance with the respective traditions.

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Academic Source References

[1] Michael Lamy, Les Templiers: Ces Grand Seigneurs aux Blancs Manteaux, Auberon (1994), Bordeaux (1997), p.28.

[2] Keith Laidler, The Head of God: The Lost Treasure of the Templars, 1st Edition, Weidenfeld & Nicolson, London (1998), p.177.

[3] Piers Paul Read, The Templars: The Dramatic History of the Knights Templar, the Most Powerful Military Order of the Crusades, 1st Edition, Weidenfeld & Nicolson, London (1999), Phoenix Press, London (2001), Orion Publishing Group, London (2012), p.305.

[4] Malcolm Barber & Keith Bate, The Templars: Selected Sources, Manchester University Press (2002), p.2.

[5] Titus Flavius Josephus, Jewish War, Rome (78 AD); Translation by William Whiston (1736), Loeb Classical Library (1926), Volume II, Book 5, pp.212, 217.

[6] Charles G. Addison, The History of the Knights Templar (1842), p.6, citing the document De Aedificiis by the 5th century Byzantine historian Procopius of Caesarea as “Procopius de Oedificiis Justiniani, Lib. 5.”

[7] Charles G. Addison, The History of the Knights Templar (1842), pp.4-5, citing a Vatican document by the 13th century Pope Urban IV (Jacques Pantaleon, 1195-1264), the Latin Patriarch of Jerusalem, as “Pantaleon, Lib. iii. p. 82.”

[8] Collier’s Encyclopedia, Thomson Gale (1985), 1985 Edition, Macmillan Library Reference (1990), “Knights Templars”.

[9] Old Testament, Authorized King James Version (AKJV), Cambridge University Press (1990), Ezekiel describing Egyptian Priesthood
inscriptions and figures inside the Temple of Solomon, Ezekiel 8:10-11.

[10] Titus Flavius Josephus, Jewish War, Rome (78 AD); Translation by William Whiston (1736), Loeb Classical Library (1926), Volume II; See pp.212, 217; The Temple contained “Babylonian” decorations of “mystical interpretation… a kind of image of the universe… all that was mystical in the heavens… [and] signs, representing living creatures.” (Book 5, Chapter 5, Part 4) Other symbols “signified the circle of the Zodiack” (Book 5, Chapter 5, Part 5).

[11] Titus Flavius Josephus, The Life of Flavius Josephus, Rome (ca. 96 AD); Translation by William Whiston (1736), Loeb Classical Library (1926), Volume I; See p.65; The Temple replica rebuilt by King Herod also “had the figures of living creatures in it” (Part 12).

[12] Prof. Arthur Samuel Peake (Editor), A Commentary on the Bible, T.C. & E.C. Jack, Ltd., London (1920), Ezekiel 8:10-11; Dr. Peake was Professor of Biblical Exegesis at University of Manchester, a Master of Arts and Doctor of Divinity.

[13] Karl Heinrich Rengstorf, Hirbet Qumran and the Problem of the Library of the Dead Sea Caves, German edition (1960), Translated by J.R. Wilkie, Leiden Press, Brill (1963).

[14] Jean-Baptiste Humbert, L’espace sacre a Qumran: Propositions pour l’Archeologie, Revue Biblique, Issue No.101 (1994), p.161-214.

[15] Minna and Kenneth Lonnqvist, Archaeology of the Hidden Qumran: The New Paradigm, Helsinki University Press, Helsinki (2002).

[16] Eric Meyers, The Oxford Encyclopedia of Archaeology in the Near East, Oxford University Press, Oxford (1997), Vol.2, pp.268-269.

[17] New Testament, Authorized King James Version (AKJV), Cambridge University Press (1990), Matthew 2:13-15.

[18] Charles F. Potter, The Lost Years of Jesus Revealed, Random House Publishers (1958): “The… [Qumran] scrolls of the great Essene library… near the Dead Sea have given us an answer at last. That during those ‘lost years’ [ages 12-30] Jesus was a student at this Essene school is becoming increasingly apparent.”

[19] Menahem Mansoor, The Dead Sea Scrolls: A College Textbook and a Study Guide, Brill Publishers (1964), p.156: “the unknown years in the life of Jesus (ages 12-30) might have been spent with the sect” of the Essenes in Alexandria.

[20] H. Spencer Lewis, The Mystical Life of Jesus, Ancient and Mystical Order Rosae Crucis, San Jose (1982).

[21] New Testament, Authorized King James Version (AKJV), Cambridge University Press (1990), Acts 24:5: “For we have found this man [Saint Paul] a pestilent fellow, and a mover of sedition among all the Jews throughout the world, and a ringleader of the sect of the Nazarenes.” (This conclusively proves that the Nazarenes, and thus also the Essenes, were never “Jewish”, as is widely and frequently claimed, but rather exclusively pre-Christian and early Christian, and wholly rejected by Judaism.)

[22] Frank Ely Gaebelein (Editor), The Expositor’s Bible Commentary: with the New International Version, 12 Volume Set, Zondervan Press (1988): The Gospel of “Matthew certainly used Nozaraios as an adjectival form of apo Nazaret (‘from Nazareth’ or ‘Nazarene’) even though the more acceptable adjective is Nazarenos” (Nazarene), which is correctly used elsewhere in the New Testament.

[23] Professor Ted Nottingham, The Mystery of the Essenes, Video of Lecture at Northwood Christian Church, Indianapolis Indiana (2010), at 24:04 and 26:00 min.

[24] Ethel Stephana Drower, The Secret Adam: A Study of Nasoraen Gnosis, Oxford University Press, London (1960), pp.ix, xiv, xvi: The original word “Nasuraiia” (Nazarenes) means the pre-Christian Gnostic Mandaen Nasoraens, who were persecuted by the Jews and thus forced to flee Jerusalem before its fall.

[25] Geoffrey W. Bromiley, The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Fully Revised Edition, Eerdmans Publishing Company (1982), Volume 3, “Nazarene”, pp.499-500.

[26] New Testament, Authorized King James Version (AKJV), Cambridge University Press (1990), Matthew 2:23: “what had been spoken through the prophets might be fulfilled, ‘He will be called a Nazorean.’”

[27] Alan Butler & Stephen Dafoe, The Warriors and Bankers, Lewis Masonic, Surrey, England (2006), p.20.

[28] Henri de Curzon, La Règle du Temple, La Société de L’Histoire de France, Paris (1886), in Librairie Renouard: “Holy Communion”, “this Religion” (Rule 2); “the Religion of knighthood” (Rule 14); “type of new Religion”, “Religion of Knights”, “Religion by armed knighthood” (Rule 57), “in every Religion” as including the Templar Order (Rule 71).

[29] Henri de Curzon, La Règle du Temple, La Société de L’Histoire de France, Paris (1886), in Librairie Renouard: “Disciples” of the Grand Master as a Pontiff (Rule 7); “Patriarchate of the Temple of Solomon” in subtle Old Latin phrase (Rule 8); “divine service… dressed with the crown” as ecclesiastical sovereignty (Rule 9); Grand Mastery exercising independent ecclesiastical authority (Rule 62); “servants of the Church” under Grand Master as a Pontiff (Rule 64).

[30] Henri de Curzon, La Règle du Temple, La Société de L’Histoire de France, Paris (1886), in Librairie Renouard: “manner and establishment… we heard” (Rule 3); “presented… the customs and observances… to make all known” (Rule 7); priestly origins “considered and examined through diligence” (Rule 8).

[31] Malcolm Barber & Keith Bate, The Templars: Selected Sources, Manchester University Press (2002), p.8.

[32] Michael Lamy, Les Templiers: Ces Grand Seigneurs aux Blancs Manteaux, Auberon (1994), Bordeaux (1997), p.28.

[33] Pope Innocent II, Omne Datum Optimum (29 March 1139), translated in: Malcolm Barber & Keith Bate, The Templars: Selected Sources, Manchester University Press (2002), pp.59-64.

[34] Hector Avalos, How Archaeology Killed Biblical History, Lecture Video, Minnesota Atheists Conference, USA (October 21, 2007), Part 1, “By 1900 AD… Solomon had a kingdom that stretched from Egypt to Iraq” (at 12:30 min); Hector Avalos holds a Masters in Theological Studies from Harvard Divinity School, and Ph.D. in Biblical Studies from Harvard University.

[35] Old Testament, Authorized King James Version (AKJV), Cambridge University Press (1990), I Kings 4:21.

[36] Charles Van der Pool, The Apostolic Bible Polyglot: Greek-English Interlinear, 2nd Edition, The Apostolic Press, Newport, Oregon (2013), I Kings 4:21.

[37] NAS Exhaustive Concordance of the Bible, The Lockman Foundation (1981), Greek Dictionary: “Heos”, “Horion”.

[38] Old Testament, Authorized King James Version (AKJV), Cambridge University Press (1990), I Kings 4:21.

[39] Old Testament, Authorized King James Version (AKJV), Cambridge University Press (1990), I Kings 4:30.

[40] Charles Van der Pool, The Apostolic Bible Polyglot: Greek-English Interlinear, 2nd Edition, The Apostolic Press, Newport, Oregon (2013), I Kings 4:30.

[41] NAS Exhaustive Concordance of the Bible, The Lockman Foundation (1981), Greek Dictionary: “Plethos”.

[42] J. Huehnergard, A Grammar of Akkadian, Eisenbrauns, Winona Lake (2005).

[43] Andrew George, Babylonian and Assyrian: A History of Akkadian, in J.N. Postgate (Editor), Languages of Iraq, Ancient and Modern, British School of Archaeology in Iraq, London (2007), pp.31-71.

[44] William L. Moran, The Amarna Letters, 1st Edition, Johns Hopkins University Press (1992), p.43.

[45] Old Testament, Authorized King James Version (AKJV), Cambridge University Press (1990), I Kings 1:39: “Zadok the Priest took an horn of oil out of the tabernacle, and anointed Solomon. And… all the people said, God save King Solomon.”

[46] James Strong, The Exhaustive Concordance of the Bible, “Strong’s Concordance”, Jennings & Graham, Cincinnati (1890), “Melek”, No.4428; “Sedeq”, No.6666.

[47] Van der Toorn, Becking & Van der Horst, Dictionary of Deities and Demons in the Bible, 1st Edition (1995), 2nd Revised Edition, Eerdmans Publishing (1999), “Elyon”, “Shalem”.

[48] Willard M. Swartley, Covenant of Peace, Eerdman’s Publishing (2006), p.255; Gary Staats, A Christological Commentary on Hebrews (2012), p.71.

[49] Old Testament, Authorized King James Version (AKJV), Cambridge University Press (1990), “And the king said unto Zadok, Carry back the Ark of God into the city” (II Samuel 15:25); “The king said also unto Zadok the priest, Art not thou a seer?” (II Samuel 15:27); God says: “But the priests… the sons of Zadok, that kept the charge of my sanctuary when the children of Israel went astray from me” (Ezekiel 44:15); “It shall be for the priests that are sanctified of the sons of Zadok; which have kept my charge, which went not astray when the children of Israel went astray, as the Levites went astray.” (Ezekiel 48:11).

[50] James Strong, The Exhaustive Concordance of the Bible, “Strong’s Concordance”, Jennings & Graham, Cincinnati (1890), “Melek”, No.4428; “Sedeq”, No.6666.

[51] Old Testament, Authorized King James Version (AKJV), Cambridge University Press (1990), Genesis 14:18: “Melchizedek king of Salem… was the priest of the most high God.”

[52] New Testament, Authorized King James Version (AKJV), Cambridge University Press (1990), Hebrews 7:1-2: “Melchisedec, king of Salem, priest of the most high God… first being by interpretation King of Righeousness, and after that also King of Salem, which is, King of Peace”.

[53] Van der Toorn, Becking & Van der Horst, Dictionary of Deities and Demons in the Bible, 1st Edition (1995), 2nd Revised Edition, Eerdmans Publishing (1999), “Elyon”, “Shalem”.

[54] New Testament, Authorized King James Version (AKJV), Cambridge University Press (1990), Hebrews 7:1-3: “Melchisedec… priest of the most high God… without father, without mother, without descent [genealogy], having neither beginning of days, nor end of life; but… abideth a priest continually.”
[55] Ian Shaw & Paul Nicholson, British Museum Dictionary of Ancient Egypt, British Museum Press, London (1995), The American University in Cairo Press, Cairo (1996), “Nubia”, pp.204-205.

[56] Juris Zarins, Early Pastoral Nomadism and the Settlement of Lower Mesopotamia, Bulletin of the American Schools of Oriental Research, Issue 280, pp.31-65.

[57] Ian Shaw & Paul Nicholson, British Museum Dictionary of Ancient Egypt, British Museum Press, London (1995), The American University in Cairo Press, Cairo (1996), “Nubia”, p.206.

[58] New Testament, Authorized King James Version (AKJV), Cambridge University Press (1990), Genesis 14:18-20; Hebrews 7:1.

[59] New Testament, Authorized King James Version (AKJV), Cambridge University Press (1990), Hebrews 7:9: “Levi also, who receiveth tithes, payed tithes in [to] Abraham. For… Melchisedec met him.”

[60] New Testament, Authorized King James Version (AKJV), Cambridge University Press (1990), I Kings 1:39: “Zadok the Priest took an horn of oil out of the tabernacle, and anointed Solomon. And… all the people said, God save King Solomon.”

[61] New Testament, Authorized King James Version (AKJV), Cambridge University Press (1990), Hebrews 5:5; 5:6; 5:10.

[62] Charles Van der Pool, The Apostolic Bible Polyglot: Greek-English Interlinear, 2nd Edition, The Apostolic Press, Newport, Oregon (2013), Hebrews 5:5; 5:6; 5:10.

[63] James Strong, The Exhaustive Concordance of the Bible, “Strong’s Concordance”, Jennings & Graham, Cincinnati (1890), “Archiereus”, No.749.

[64] New Testament, Authorized King James Version (AKJV), Cambridge University Press (1990), Hebrews 5:6, 5:10, 6:20, 7:17, 7:20.

[65] Charles Van der Pool, The Apostolic Bible Polyglot: Greek-English Interlinear, 2nd Edition, The Apostolic Press, Newport, Oregon (2013), Hebrews 5:6, 5:10, 6:20, 7:17, 7:20.

[66] James Strong, The Exhaustive Concordance of the Bible, “Strong’s Concordance”, Jennings & Graham, Cincinnati (1890), “Kata”, No.2596; “Taxis”, No.5010.

[67] New Testament, Authorized King James Version (AKJV), Cambridge University Press (1990), Hebrews 5:1, 10:21.

[68] Sir Alan G. Gardiner, Egyptian Grammar: The Study of Hieroglyphs, Ashmolean Museum of Oxford University, Griffith Institute, Oxford (1927), “Aten” (Spirit of Sun Rays = Christian “Holy Spirit” or “Power of God”), List of Hieroglyphic Signs (pp.438 et seq.): “Aten”, N8; “Ka” (“Spirit”, Hands used on the Aten rays), D28.

[69] Donald B. Redford, The Oxford Encyclopedia of Ancient Egypt, The American University in Cairo Press (2001), Vol.1, “Aten”, p.157.
[70] Sir Alan G. Gardiner, Egyptian Grammar: The Study of Hieroglyphs, Ashmolean Museum of Oxford University, Griffith Institute, Oxford (1927), “Aten”, N8.

[71] Donald B. Redford, The Oxford Encyclopedia of Ancient Egypt, The American University in Cairo Press (2001), Vol.1, “Aten”, p.156.

[72] Donald B. Redford, The Oxford Encyclopedia of Ancient Egypt, The American University in Cairo Press (2001), Vol.1, “Aten”, pp.157-158.

[73] New World Encyclopedia, Paragon House Publishers (September 2013), “Egyptian Book of the Dead”, “Spell 125: The Negative Confessions”.

[74] Miriam Lichtheim, Ancient Egyptian Literature: A Book of Readings, Volume 2, University of California Press (1976), Part 3: “From the Book of the Dead”, “Chapter 125” at p.124.

[75] Sir Earnest Alfred Wallis Budge, The Book of the Dead (1895), Grammercy Books, Random House Publishing, New York (1999), official translation by 19th century archaeologists, Chapter CXXV (125): “The Negative Confession”, from the Papyrus of Ani, at p.576.

[76] Ian Shaw & Paul Nicholson, British Museum Dictionary of Ancient Egypt, The Trustees of the British Museum, London (1995), The American University in Cairo Press (1996), “Stele”, p.278.

[77] New Testament, Authorized King James Version (AKJV), Cambridge University Press (1990), Genesis 14:18-20.

[78] Sir Alan G. Gardiner, Egyptian Grammar: The Study of Hieroglyphs, Ashmolean Museum of Oxford University, Griffith Institute, Oxford (1927), “Se Neter” (“Infuse with God” = Christian “Consecrate”), List of Hieroglyphic Signs (pp.438 et seq.): “S NTR” (“Consecrate”), S29-R8, R8-T22-X1-D21; “NTR” (“God”, Holiness, Astral), R8, R8-N14.

[79] Richard H. Wilkinson, The Complete Temples of Ancient Egypt, Thames & Hudson, London (2000), pp.12-13, p.72.

[80] Ian Shaw & Paul Nicholson, British Museum Dictionary of Ancient Egypt, The Trustees of the British Museum, London (1995), The American University in Cairo Press, Cairo (1996), “Priests”, p.228.

[81] Sir Alan G. Gardiner, Egyptian Grammar: The Study of Hieroglyphs, Ashmolean Museum of Oxford University, Griffith Institute, Oxford (1927), “List of Hieroglyphic Signs” (pp.438 et seq.), “Egyptian-English Vocabulary” (pp.549 et seq.), “English-Egyptian Vocabulary” (pp.605 et seq.).

[82] Sir Alan G. Gardiner, Egyptian Grammar: The Study of Hieroglyphs, Ashmolean Museum of Oxford University, Griffith Institute, Oxford (1927), “Immy Sitaa” (“Initiate” = Christian “Acolyte”), List of Hieroglyphic Signs (pp.438 et seq.): “IMY” (“who is in”), M17-Z11-G17-Z4, Z11, Z11-G17; “ST A” (library, “place of records archive”), Q1-X1- D36-Y1, Q1-X1-O1-D36,Y2.

[83] Sir Alan G. Gardiner, Egyptian Grammar: The Study of Hieroglyphs, Ashmolean Museum of Oxford University, Griffith Institute, Oxford (1927), “Khry Hebit” (“Lector Priest” = Christian “Deacon”), List of Hieroglyphic Signs (pp.438 et seq.): “XRY HBT” (“Lector Priest”), V28-T28-D58, W5A-A1, W5, T28-D21-V28-D58-W3-N5-A1; “XRY A” (“Apprentice, assistant”), T28-D21-D36-Z1-A1; “XRY” (base level, “ground floor”, “lower”), T28-D21-Z4; “HBT” (“ritual book”), V28-D58-X1-W3-V12, W4-X1-Y1.

[84] Sir Alan G. Gardiner, Egyptian Grammar: The Study of Hieroglyphs, Ashmolean Museum of Oxford University, Griffith Institute, Oxford (1927), “Hem Wab” (“Priest of Purity” = Christian Ordained “Priest”), List of Hieroglyphic Signs (pp.438 et seq.): “HM KA” (“soul priest”), D375-A1, D31, D375-M17-M17-D40-A1; “WAB” (“Wab Priest”), D60-N35A-A1, D60-A1;

[85] Sir Alan G. Gardiner, Egyptian Grammar: The Study of Hieroglyphs, Ashmolean Museum of Oxford University, Griffith Institute, Oxford (1927), “Hem Neter” (“Priest of God” = Christian “Monsignor”), List of Hieroglyphic Signs (pp.438 et seq.): “HM NTR” (“prophet”), R8-U36; “HM KA” (“soul priest”), D375-A1, D31, D375-M17-M17-D40-A1; “HM” (“majesty”), U36-A40, U36-Z1-G7; “NTR” (“God”), R8-N14.

[86] Sir Alan G. Gardiner, Egyptian Grammar: The Study of Hieroglyphs, Ashmolean Museum of Oxford University, Griffith Institute, Oxford (1927), “Sesh Mediw Neter” (“Scribe of the Word of God” = Christian “Doctor of Divinity”), List of Hieroglyphic Signs (pp.438 et seq.): “SSh” (“Scribe”), Y3-A1, O34-N37-Y1; “MDW NTR” (“Word of God”), R8-S43-D46-G43-A2, R8-S43-Y2, S43-D46-G43-Y1-Z2-R8.

[87] Sir Alan G. Gardiner, Egyptian Grammar: The Study of Hieroglyphs, Ashmolean Museum of Oxford University, Griffith Institute, Oxford (1927), “Sem Tery” (“High Priest” = Christian Consecrated “Bishop”), List of Hieroglyphic Signs (pp.438 et seq.): “SM” (“priest”), S29-G17-A1; “TRY” (“high priest”), D1-Q3-Z4, T8, D1-Q3.

[88] Sir Alan G. Gardiner, Egyptian Grammar: The Study of Hieroglyphs, Ashmolean Museum of Oxford University, Griffith Institute, Oxford (1927), “Meti N Sa” (“Arch High Priest” = Christian “Archbishop”), List of Hieroglyphic Signs (pp.438 et seq.): “MTY N SA” (“controller of priestly phyle”), D52-X1-N35-V16, D51-X1-Z4-A1-N35-V17-A1-Z2.

[89] Sir Alan G. Gardiner, Egyptian Grammar: The Study of Hieroglyphs, Ashmolean Museum of Oxford University, Griffith Institute, Oxford (1927), “Miter Sem Tery” (“Master High Priest” = Christian “Cardinal”), List of Hieroglyphic Signs (pp.438 et seq.): “MTR” (master or teacher, “instruct” and “exhibit virtues” as teaching), D52-X1-D21; “SM” (“priest”), S29-G17-A1; “TRY” (“high priest”), D1-Q3-Z4, T8, D1-Q3.

[90] Sir Alan G. Gardiner, Egyptian Grammar: The Study of Hieroglyphs, Ashmolean Museum of Oxford University, Griffith Institute, Oxford (1927), “Miter Neter Tepi” (“First Teacher of God” = Christian “Pontiff”), List of Hieroglyphic Signs (pp.438 et seq.): “MTR” (teacher, “instruct” and “exhibit virtues” as teaching), D52-X1-D21; “NTR” (“God”, Holiness, Astral), R8, R8-N14; “TPY” (“First High Priest”), D1-Q3-Z4, D1-Q3, T8; “TP” (Pontiff, “Chief” High Priest), D1-Z1, D1-Q3.

[91] Montague Rhodes James, The Apocryphal New Testament, Oxford University Press (1707), Clarendon Press, Oxford (1924), Acts of Thomas, 27.

[92] Montague Rhodes James, The Apocryphal New Testament, Oxford University Press (1707), Clarendon Press, Oxford (1924), Pistis Sophia, 36, pp.46-47.

[93] Old Testament, Authorized King James Version (AKJV), Cambridge University Press (1990), Proverbs 9:1.

[94] Richard H. Wilkinson, The Complete Temples of Ancient Egypt, Thames & Hudson, London (2000), Chapter 5, “Western Thebes: Medinet Habu”, p.193; “Chronology of the Temple Builders”, p.12.

[95] New Testament, Authorized King James Version (AKJV), Cambridge University Press (1990), Matthew 16:19.

[96] Sir Alan G. Gardiner, Egyptian Grammar: The Study of Hieroglyphs, Ashmolean Museum of Oxford University, Griffith Institute, Oxford (1927), “Zez Demid Mat Niwet Per” (“Move to Bind the Heavens by the Lower Heaven of the Temple”), List of Hieroglyphic Signs (pp.438 et seq.): “ZHZ” (Move, “shake” as a “flagellum”), S45; “DMD” (Bind, “Unite” as “knotted strips of cloth” bound together), S23; “SNW” (Bind, “cartouche” by “rope encircling a region” being “bound” to close the circle), V9; “MAT” (heavens, realm of God, as “kind of land”), Aa-6; “NIWT” (“lower heaven”), N35-X1-O49-N50, O49-X1-Z1, O49; “NIWTY” (divine house), O49-G4; “PR” (“Temple”), O49.

[97] Sir Alan G. Gardiner, Egyptian Grammar: The Study of Hieroglyphs, Ashmolean Museum of Oxford University, Griffith Institute, Oxford (1927), “Neterwoo” (“Gods” = Christian “Angels” and “Saints”), List of Hieroglyphic Signs (pp.438 et seq.): “NTRW” (Holies, such as Angels or Saints, mistranslated as “Gods”), R8-R8-R8, (Prophets speaking Holiness) R8-N35-M6-M6-M6; “HM NTR” (“Prophet” as a Saint), R8-U36; “NTR” (Holiness as Saintly: flag), R8, (Astral as Angelic: flag-star), R8-N14; “TRY” (Holiness or Divinity, as “high priest”), D1-Q3-Z4, T8, D1-Q3; “NIWTYW” (People, “citizens”, as “of” or “from” the Temple complex) O49-X1-G4-A1-Z2; “DWT NTR” (“Netherworld”: circled star), N15.

[98] Sir Alan G. Gardiner, Egyptian Grammar: The Study of Hieroglyphs, Ashmolean Museum of Oxford University, Griffith Institute, Oxford (1927), “Dewit Neter” (“Netherworld” as heavenly realm), List of Hieroglyphic Signs (pp.438 et seq.): “DWT NTR” (“Netherworld”: circled star), N15.

[99] Old Testament, Authorized King James Version (AKJV), Cambridge University Press (1990), Isaiah 41:21-23, “Produce your cause, saith the Lord; bring forth your strong reasons… Shew the things that are to come hereafter, that we may know that ye are gods; yea, do good.”; Psalm 82:1-7, “God standeth in the congregation of the mighty; He judgeth among the gods. … I have said, Ye are gods, and all of you are children of the Most High.”

[100] Old Testament, Authorized King James Version (AKJV), Cambridge University Press (1990), John 10:34-35, “Jesus answered them, Is it not written in your law, ‘I said, Ye are gods’? If he called them gods, unto whom the word of God came, and the scripture cannot be broken.”

[101] The Vatican, The Catholic Encyclopedia (1908), Volume 4, “Councils”, “III. Historical Sketch of Ecumenical Councils”, Part 7, p.425.

[102] The Vatican, The Catholic Encyclopedia (1911), Volume 11, “Nicaea, Councils of”, “II. Second Council of Nicaea”, p.46.
[103] The Holy Bible, Authorized King James Version (AKJV), Cambridge University Press (1990): For the Ark of the Covenant… “make one cherub [angel] on the one end, and the other cherub on the other end.” (Exodus 25:19; Numbers 7:89); For the Temple of Solomon: “And it was made with cherubims [angels]… From the ground unto above the door were cherubims… and on the wall of the Temple.” (Ezekiel 41:18-20); Confirmed in the New Testament: “And over it the cherubims [angels] of glory shadowing the mercy seat” (Hebrews 9:5).